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Archive for August, 2011

Team Up! Coming Fall 2011 at the Health Adventure

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011

ASHEVILLE, NC – How fast is your fastball? Can a floor surface affect your athletic ability? Do you want to know how to make a perfect bounce pass? Come and get all of your questions answered in the new traveling exhibition, “Team Up! Explore Science & Sports”. Through numerous interactive components such as Bounce Pass and Ricochet Racquet, children and adults alike will marvel at the many scientific principles that make sports a reality in this exciting new traveling exhibition. Visitors will have opportunities to test their own skills in such sports as basketball, football, baseball, tennis, soccer and even extreme sports like snowboarding. At the same time, guests will be amazed and educated at the level of science that is involved in sports. Geometry, physics, force, and friction will be explained to children in a way that is intriguing and relative to sport.

Entry – Guests are greeted by colorful characters and walk under a football goal post as they enter Team Up! Explore Science and Sports. The entry panels are complete with national sponsor signage and a place for each venue to display their local sponsors.

Ricochet Racquet – Adjust the angle of an oversized tennis racquet in an effort to hit the target with tennis balls. Visitors will shoot the tennis balls at the giant racquet, adjusting the angle of the racquet face to get the proper trajectory. Ricochet Racquet is an enclosed component for safety and to eliminate the loss of tennis balls.

Locker Room – Dress like the pros in the Locker Room. This interactive station features equipment and apparel that mirrors the equipment worn by the pros. Not only do guests have the opportunity to “gear-up”, but they can also view professional equipment that is safely displayed behind plexi-glass. Four sports are on display; baseball, football, soccer and hockey.

Balancing Acts A balance beam, a pommel horse, and tabletop balancing experiments offer the visitor the opportunity to explore aspects of balance in this exhibit area. Visitors are given a perspective as to just how difficult it is to be an Olympic caliber gymnast.

Bounce Pass – Make that perfect pass just like your favorite point guard! Visitors are challenged to determine the correct amount of force at the proper angle to create just the right bounce to pass a basketball past a barrier to a “teammate” on the other side.

Set Shot – Set Shot tests the patience of the visitor as it asks them to take on a very difficult task. This component teaches about trajectories by asking the visitor to shoot a marble-size basketball through a tiny hoop. This can only be accomplished if the trajectory of the ball is exact.

Sweet Spot – It’s going, going, gone! Only if you hit the ball on the sweet spot. Baseball bats have one ideal spot to strike a ball, where the maximum amount of energy will transfer to the ball, and the minimum amount of energy will travel back through the bat into the batter’s hands. This exhibit is a hands-on demonstration of this phenomenon. If you strike the ball on the sweet spot, you will feel virtually no vibration. See just how difficult it is to hit a round ball with a round bat.

Inside Scoop – Cross-sections of different balls and other sports equipment reveal the construction methods and materials used in today’s high-tech sports equipment. Research and development of such items as hockey sticks and baseball bats is never-ending, but with the Inside Scoop visitors know the importance of staying on top of your game with modern technology.

Get in the Game – Packed with action and YOU as the talent, Get in the Game will immerse visitors in the world of virtual reality! This virtual reality system allows visitors to watch themselves on a TV monitor as they play volleyball, soccer, or ski downhill.

How Fast Was That Pitch? – Visitors can measure the speed of their throw in this radar-equipped pitching booth. This interactive station allows guests to see just what makes those Major League pitchers so special. You think you got what it takes? Test your ability and then you will know just how fast 90 miles per hour is…

The Sole of the Game – Soles of different types of athletic footwear are displayed here. Visitors are challenged to match the sole of the shoe to the sport for which it is used.

Twin Spin – This exhibit features two mannequins that rotate on metal rods. One portrays a gymnast in a tucked position, the other is outstretched. The visitor is asked to predict and observe how the figures spin differently.

Name That Ball – Here visitors are invited to identify balls used in various sports by touch. Some may be simple, but some will keep you guessing for a long time. You may know a tennis ball or a baseball, but there are some intriguing spheres here that will test your sports I.Q.

Sports Figures – How do they do that? A question often asked when discussing today’s athletes. In this exciting component, visitors are immersed in the television show, “ESPN Sports Figures” and many of their questions are answered. Sports Figures touches on all sports and details the most difficult scientific principles, while relaying the messages in a manner that even elementary age visitors can comprehend.

Team Up! created by Discovery Center, Rockford, IL, and The Family Museum of Arts and Science, Bettendorf, IA

North Carolina Arboretum Hosts an Array of Fall Events

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011

ASHEVILLE, NC – The North Carolina Arboretum invites visitors to discover the beauty of the season at an array of fall events. Offering inspiration for garden and craft enthusiasts, the events will educate and entertain. Events for fall 2011 include:

Heritage Crafts Day—Saturday, September 24 from 11:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. Now in its sixth year, Heritage Crafts Day features artists and crafters whose work reflects the heritage of Western North Carolina. Vitally important to the region’s craft heritage is the close relationship between the crafts and plants used in their production. Much of the artistic expression of mountain crafts originates from the character and nature of plants.

Fine crafts made from local and natural materials will be highlighted, as will art created from recycled and sustainable sources. Visitors to Heritage Crafts Day are encouraged to explore the Arboretum’s Heritage Garden. The garden showcases plants used in the multi-million-dollar craft industry of Western North Carolina, including those used for handmade paper and brooms, baskets and dyes. Visitors can discover the many plants that support crafts and understand how they are grown, prepared, and used in the industry.

Carolina Bonsai Expo—Saturday and Sunday, October 8-9 Now in its 16th year, the Carolina Bonsai Expo is the premier event hosted by the Arboretum. Featuring juried exhibits by bonsai enthusiasts from throughout the southeast, a renowned bonsai marketplace, workshops, free demonstrations, and an Ikebana exhibit, the Expo is a two-day horticultural extravaganza.

Each year, a special guest bonsai artist provides educational programs for the public and a critique of the show for the benefit of participating clubs. This year’s guest is Mr. Walter Pall of Austria, who is widely recognized as one of the leading western bonsai artists in the world today.
The Expo is a perfect occasion to explore the Arboretum’s Bonsai Exhibition Garden, which offers a world-class display that innovatively establishes bonsai in the context of the Southern Appalachians.

The North Carolina Chrysanthemum Society Annual Show—Saturday and Sunday, October 15-16 Hundreds of chrysanthemum blooms will fill the Arboretum Education Center in a kaleidoscope of vivid colors. This annual show is judged by expert Accredited National Chrysanthemum judges from across the country according to strict National Chrysanthemum Society standards. Hours for Saturday are 1:00 to 5:00 p.m., and hours on Sunday are 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.

The theme of this year’s event, “Shades of Fall,” highlights the bold and beautiful colors of the season in Western North Carolina. Visitors will learn more about growing show-quality chrysanthemums, and flowers will be available for purchase. The weekend also provides the opportunity to explore the Arboretum’s hiking and biking trails to view the fall foliage.

Each year more than 376,000 visitors experience the Arboretum’s gardens, trails, exhibits, shows and expos, educational programs, demonstrations and lectures. The Arboretum’s ability to meet its mission and enrich the visitor experience is made possible by a community of supporters—from members, volunteers and staff to state and local funds, tribute gifts, grants, and community partners.

Shows and events are free for Arboretum Society members or with the standard parking fee ($8 per personal vehicle). For information, call (828) 665-2492 or visit www.ncarboretum.org. The central mission of The North Carolina Arboretum, an affiliate institution of the 17-campus University of North Carolina system, is to cultivate connections between people and plants.

WCU Arts and Culture Series Opens 2011-12 Season with Doxita

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011

ASHEVILLE, NC – A checkpoint on the Pakistan-India border and Peruvian workers traveling by boat to an island of birds are just two of the scenes from the upcoming opening of the Arts and Cultural Events Performance Series at Western Carolina University.

The ACE series opens at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 20, in the theater of the A.K. Hinds University Center with Doxita, a film festival that began in 2008 and showcases documentaries under 40 minutes in length. This year, Doxita consists of four films, each centered on a common theme of “inside/outside.” The films are “Guañape Sur” (Janos Richter, Italy), about Peruvian workers who harvest soil from an island of birds; “Wagah” (Supriyo Sen, Germany), about national identity expressed daily by thousands of spectators at a flag ceremony on the border between India and Pakistan; “My Name is Sydney” (Melanie Levy, USA), about the complex inner life of a severely autistic teenage girl; and “Arsy Versy” (Miro Remo, Slovakia), a quirky portrait of a man who follows his own spirit.

The program represents a variety of documentary styles – domestic and foreign, short and longer format, serious and funny – and is designed to profile the content and artistic vision that nonfiction short films provide but that people don’t often get a chance to see. This is the second year that Western Carolina has presented Doxita. “Last year we packed the house,” said Lori Davis, assistant director of programs at University Center. “You’ll probably never find these films anywhere but here.”

The Arts and Cultural Events Performance Series (formerly the Lectures, Concerts and Exhibition Series) is presented annually at WCU and is designed to appeal to and be accessible to everyone, Davis said. “The point of the arts is to open minds. It’s never too late to learn to love them.”

Other upcoming ACE events are as follows:

  • Shanghai Opera Orchestra, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 27, Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center. The Shanghai Opera Orchestra is a premier Chinese orchestral ensemble making its first United States tour. The program features Chinese traditional and contemporary music performed on traditional instruments. This event is sponsored by ACE, WCU’s College of Fine and Performing Arts and its School of Music, and Folkmoot. Ticket prices are $10 ($5 for students).
  • The Second City presents “Laugh Out Loud,” 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29, at the Bardo Arts Center. America’s famed comedy troupe, The Second City, brings in the comedy world’s next generation for an evening of sketch comedy and trademark improvisation. Ticket prices are $10 ($5 for students).
  • Jeff Biggers, 9 a.m. Friday, Oct. 21, in the University Center Grandroom. Author of “Reckoning at Eagle Creek,” “The United States of Appalachia” and “In the Sierra Madre,” Biggers has worked as a writer, educator and radio correspondent across the United States, Europe, India and Mexico. His award-winning stories have appeared on National Public Radio and Public Radio International and in the Washington Post, The Nation, The Atlantic and Salon. Biggers is the recipient of many literary honors, including an American Book Award. This event is free as part of the 2011 Rooted in the Mountains Symposium. For more information about Rooted in the Mountains, visit rootedinthemtns.wcu.edu.
  • “The Miles Davis Experience: 1949-1959,” 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 15, at the Bardo Arts Center. This performance recaptures the sound and historical and cultural context of a critical period of American history through the lens of jazz music and its most iconic innovator, Miles Davis. The show includes live music performed in the manner it was first presented, with photos and film clips brought together by a beat poet-style narrator. Tickets go on sale Oct. 11 and cost $10 ($5 for students).
  • The Poetry Revival, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25, in the Bardo Arts Center. An uplifting spoken word experience, the Poetry Revival features writer/poet Derrick Brown; Anis Mojgani, a two-time individual National Poetry Slam champion; and Buddy Wakefield, a two-time individual World Poetry Slam champion. Tickets go on sale Nov. 14 and cost $5.
  • Flamenco Vivo presents “La Pasión Flamenca,” 7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 13, in the Bardo Arts Center. Carlota Santana, called the “Keeper of Flamenco” by Dance Magazine, and Flamenco Vivo provide passion and drama in this eclectic program of Spanish dance and music featuring solos, duets and company dances. Experience a journey back to the cultural crossroads of Andalusia, the southern region of Spain and the birthplace of flamenco. Tickets go on sale Jan. 9 and cost $10 ($5 for students).
  • Nick Flynn, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 22, in the recital hall of the Coulter Building. Flynn is the author of two memoirs and the recipient of the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for the Art of the Memoir. This event is free as part of the 2012 Literary Festival at WCU. For more information about the Literary Festival, visit www.litfestival.org.

For tickets or information on shows appearing at the Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center, contact the box office at 828-227-2479 or visit bardoartscenter.wcu.edu. For more information about ACE, or to propose ideas for future ACE events, contact Davis at 828-227-3622 or visit ace.wcu.edu.

River Arts District Transportation Project Public Meeting Scheduled

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

ASHEVILLE, NC – The second public meeting for the Wilma Dykeman Riverway River Arts Distric Transportation Project will take place Thursday, September 29, from 4 – 7 p.m.  The meeting will be held at Asheville Area Habitat for Humanity’s Conference Room (located in the administrative building on Meadown Road near AB Tech and Biltmore Village, just west of the Asheville Habitat ReStore).

The meeting will be a highly interactive, open-house style community meeting.  The consultant team and city staff will present the study process to date and will be available to discuss and gather feedback from members of the public on the potential alternatives.

Fall Colors Should Be ‘Excellent’

Monday, August 29th, 2011

ASHEVILLE, NC – Kathy Mathews predicts 2011 will offer an excellent season for fall colors in the Western North Carolina mountains.

The annual prediction from Kathy Mathews, Western Carolina University’s fearless fall foliage forecaster, should make chamber of commerce officials across the Western North Carolina mountains happy this year.

That’s because Mathews is calling for an excellent fall color show, thanks in large part to weather conditions over the spring and summer.

“2011 should prove to be an excellent year for fall color,” said Mathews, WCU associate professor of biology specializing in plant systematics. “While heavy spring rain is generally not a good sign for fall color, records indicate that rainfall was slightly below normal for March, average for April and May, and slightly below normal for June and July, as gardeners struggled to keep their crops watered,” she said. “These conditions actually are promising for good development of leaf color in September and October.”

In addition, mid-August brought a respite from the hot temperatures of June and July, another good sign of vibrant leaf color during autumn, she said.

Mathews believes that the formation of higher levels of yellow, orange and red pigments in the leaves seems to correlate with dry weather throughout the year. The drier the climate, the more brilliant the fall leaves tend to be, she said.

Of course, when it comes to forecasting the vibrancy of the fall color season, just as with forecasting the weather, there are no guarantees. Cloud cover and ample rainfall in the weeks ahead could mute the color show, Mathews said.

“Anyone remembering the last two years may have noticed a shortage of brilliant red leaves in our area, which could be blamed on cloudy weather and rain during the fall,” she said. “Hurricane season also can be hard to predict as far as bringing rain to the mountains, but if we see cool and sunny weather, we can expect nice red color to develop this year.”

Some weather forecast models show Hurricane Irene, currently moving across the Caribbean Sea, dropping heavy rains on Western North Carolina, which could affect fall colors in the mountains, Mathews said.

Cooler temperatures of autumn contribute to the decomposition of chlorophyll, the chemical that gives leaves their green color in spring and summer. As chlorophyll breaks down, yellow pigments – always present in the leaves, but masked by the green of chlorophyll – are revealed, and new red pigments are produced.

Depending upon the timing of the first frost, the peak of fall color should arrive during the second week of October in the higher elevations, and during the third week of October in the mid-elevations, Mathews said.

“Early November can bring surprising bursts of color, too, particularly between 2,500 and 3,000 feet as the oaks peak out in oranges and reds while other trees’ colors are lingering,” she said. “Those planning leaf-peeping vacations should have a fairly broad window of time in which to choose for viewing excellent color change in the mountains this year.”

The color change should begin at the higher mountain elevations in late September and continue through mid-November in the lower levels of WNC.

“Look for the earliest color change to take place on the sourwoods and dogwoods, which both turn red, as well as the tulip poplars, which become yellow but tend to turn brown early,” Mathews said. “Colorful maples, with hues of red, orange and yellow, and birches, which turn yellow, bring us into the peak period. Finally, oaks turn orange and red to round out the later color change in the season.”

Sweet birches and tulip poplars already are starting to turn yellow in the mid-elevations around Cullowhee, which is a normal occurrence for this time of year, she said.

“Over the month of September, the color change should continue and spread. Expect buckeyes to give pops of orange early, as well. Maples will add more yellow, oranges and reds as they gradually change in late September, and sourwoods should turn a beautiful, deep red,” Mathews said.

Fall Colors Should Be ‘Excellent’

Monday, August 29th, 2011

ASHEVILLE, NC – Kathy Mathews predicts 2011 will offer an excellent season for fall colors in the Western North Carolina mountains.

The annual prediction from Kathy Mathews, Western Carolina University’s fearless fall foliage forecaster, should make chamber of commerce officials across the Western North Carolina mountains happy this year.

That’s because Mathews is calling for an excellent fall color show, thanks in large part to weather conditions over the spring and summer.

“2011 should prove to be an excellent year for fall color,” said Mathews, WCU associate professor of biology specializing in plant systematics. “While heavy spring rain is generally not a good sign for fall color, records indicate that rainfall was slightly below normal for March, average for April and May, and slightly below normal for June and July, as gardeners struggled to keep their crops watered,” she said. “These conditions actually are promising for good development of leaf color in September and October.”

In addition, mid-August brought a respite from the hot temperatures of June and July, another good sign of vibrant leaf color during autumn, she said.

Mathews believes that the formation of higher levels of yellow, orange and red pigments in the leaves seems to correlate with dry weather throughout the year. The drier the climate, the more brilliant the fall leaves tend to be, she said.

Of course, when it comes to forecasting the vibrancy of the fall color season, just as with forecasting the weather, there are no guarantees. Cloud cover and ample rainfall in the weeks ahead could mute the color show, Mathews said.

“Anyone remembering the last two years may have noticed a shortage of brilliant red leaves in our area, which could be blamed on cloudy weather and rain during the fall,” she said. “Hurricane season also can be hard to predict as far as bringing rain to the mountains, but if we see cool and sunny weather, we can expect nice red color to develop this year.”

Some weather forecast models show Hurricane Irene, currently moving across the Caribbean Sea, dropping heavy rains on Western North Carolina, which could affect fall colors in the mountains, Mathews said.

Cooler temperatures of autumn contribute to the decomposition of chlorophyll, the chemical that gives leaves their green color in spring and summer. As chlorophyll breaks down, yellow pigments – always present in the leaves, but masked by the green of chlorophyll – are revealed, and new red pigments are produced.

Depending upon the timing of the first frost, the peak of fall color should arrive during the second week of October in the higher elevations, and during the third week of October in the mid-elevations, Mathews said.

“Early November can bring surprising bursts of color, too, particularly between 2,500 and 3,000 feet as the oaks peak out in oranges and reds while other trees’ colors are lingering,” she said. “Those planning leaf-peeping vacations should have a fairly broad window of time in which to choose for viewing excellent color change in the mountains this year.”

The color change should begin at the higher mountain elevations in late September and continue through mid-November in the lower levels of WNC.

“Look for the earliest color change to take place on the sourwoods and dogwoods, which both turn red, as well as the tulip poplars, which become yellow but tend to turn brown early,” Mathews said. “Colorful maples, with hues of red, orange and yellow, and birches, which turn yellow, bring us into the peak period. Finally, oaks turn orange and red to round out the later color change in the season.”

Sweet birches and tulip poplars already are starting to turn yellow in the mid-elevations around Cullowhee, which is a normal occurrence for this time of year, she said.

“Over the month of September, the color change should continue and spread. Expect buckeyes to give pops of orange early, as well. Maples will add more yellow, oranges and reds as they gradually change in late September, and sourwoods should turn a beautiful, deep red,” Mathews said.

Park Ridge Health Free Health Screenings Sept 7-10

Monday, August 29th, 2011

ASHEVILLE, NC – Park Ridge Health announces next week’s health events, all free screenings this time.  Park Ridge Health has great events every week with different health screenings and information.

WOW – Free Cholesterol Screening – 1st Presbyterian Church Hendersonville

September 7 / 8:00am – 11:00am

Lipid and glucose profiles by finger stick, along with blood pressure and body mass index screening. For best results, fast overnight.

1st Presbyterian Church

399 N. Grove Street

Hendersonville, NC 28792

 

WOW – Free Cholesterol Screening – Burton Street Community Center Asheville

September 10 / 8:00am – 11:00am

Lipid and glucose profiles by finger stick, along with blood pressure and body mass index screening. For best results, fast overnight.

Burton Street Community Center

134 Burton Street

Asheville, NC 28806

 

WOW – Free Blood Pressure & Glucose Screening – Hillcrest Apartments Asheville

September 10 / 1:00pm – 4:00pm

Blood pressure for hypertension screening and blood glucose testing for diabetes. Fasting preferred, but not required.

Hillcrest Apartments

100 Atkinson Street

Asheville, NC 28801

 

3rd Annual WNC Fly Fishing Expo set for Nov. 5-6, 2011

Monday, August 29th, 2011

ASHEVILLE, NC – The 3rd Annual WNC Fly Fishing Expo kicks off on Nov. 5 at the WNC Agricultural Center. Western North Carolina is blessed with altitude, clean streams, wild trout and consequently, an abundance of people who love to fly fish. The WNC Fly Fishing Expo is a two-day fly fishing extravaganza providing anglers a forum to learn the very latest news and innovations in their sport.

“This event appeals to fly fishers of all levels,” said expo organizer Frank Smith. “Whether you are an advanced angler looking for the latest gear, or a beginner who is ready to get the waders wet, there is something for everyone at this show. And we have brought in a new group of experts who will host a variety of fly fishing related programs.”

Over the years there has been no shortage of things to see and do at the WNC Fly Fishing Expo, and this year will be no different. The lineup for the 3rd Annual event features even more exhibits and speakers than previous years. For those who want to learn more about fly fishing, a distinguished roster of experts will hold programs and presentations throughout the weekend (visit www.wncflyfishingexpo.com for more information.) Presenters include outdoor and fly fishing author Jim Casada; advocate Tim Landis, an instrumental figure in protecting wild fish on the South Holston; fly fishing instructor Star Nolan; Capt. Paul Rose, a pro at sight-fishing for carp; Bill Strickland, expert on the secrets of the Davison River; strike indicator developer Steven Vorkapich; and Beau Beasley, who will introduce folks to trout fishing in Virginia. Pair these top notch programs with fly tying and casting demonstrations from expert instructors, and attendees have the opportunity to learn just about everything there is to know about fly fishing.

Nationally known manufacturers such as Abel, Orvis, Sage, Simms and Fishpond will showcase the newest gear. Area fishing lodges and guide outfitters will give advice about where to fish; organizations dedicated to protecting trout waters and habitat will discuss current issues and initiatives; and more than a dozen fly shops from all over WNC will have every piece of gear imaginable for sale.

The show opens on Saturday at 9 a.m. and runs until 5 p.m., then continues on Sunday from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Tickets are available at the door and are $10 for adults and free for children under 16.

Saturday features a local beer tasting with Asheville’s own Highland Brewing Company. The tasting lasts from 2:30 p.m. until 5 p.m. and 12 Bones will be on site throughout the event, cooking up barbeque for hungry expo attendees.

Shoegazers to Descend on Asheville October 1st for “Static Bliss” Festival

Monday, August 29th, 2011

ASHEVILLE, NC – On Saturday, October 1st, Asheville Shoegaze, an ever growing Asheville music community, will present “Static Bliss,” one of the bigger festivals of its kind in the US, and will showcase Shoegaze, Dreampop and Psychedelic Rock from all over the east coast. The event will be held at The Garage at Biltmore, 101 Fairview Road.

The festival is being organized by Asheville Shoegaze founder Ashe Ruppe, who has had success in the past organizing shows in Asheville and other U.S. Cities. The Shoegaze genre can be traced back to the late 80s and early 90s, with pioneering bands such as Jesus and The Mary Chain, Slowdive, Ride, My Bloody Valentine and others. More recently, there has been a resurgence of the genre, identifiable by its distorted guitar and subdued vocal styles, though some would argue that it never really went away.

The bands who have signed on for this event are: Ceremony, The Stargazer Lilies, Screen Vinyl Image, Last Remaining Pinnacle, The Sunshine Factory, Pan Galactic Straw Boss, The Sky Drops, and local favorites Knives and Daggers and Glass Arcana (Ruppe’s band.) Additional bands may be added. With a roster such as this, a sellout has been predicted.

“We’re still confirming one or two bands, but it’s really coming together. There will probably be eight or nine bands total from all over the east coast, plus one or two Djs from Charlotte and Chicago,” Ruppe said, “If all goes well, we could make Static Bliss an annual event in Asheville,” he added, “With so many good bands with worldwide recognition, I have the feeling it will be packed with people from all over.”

Tickets will go on sale on September 1st and will be available through the Asheville Shoegaze page as well as at the door. Tickets will be priced between $15 and $30 for limited VIP passes.

About Asheville Shoegaze: Founder, Ashe Ruppe, started  Asheville Shoegaze to see if people in Asheville would embrace this style of music and to see if the scene would support playing live. Since its inception earlier in the year, it has grown steadily and has received attention from Shoegaze labels and many touring bands looking for a venue before or after Atlanta shows.

Grove Park Inn Golf Tournament to Salute Local Firefighters, Police Officers, and EMS Workers

Monday, August 29th, 2011

ASHEVILLE, NC – The Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa is holding a special golf tournament to benefit the Asheville Fire Department’s Fallen Firefighters Fund. On Monday September 12, from 8:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m., firefighters, police officers and EMS workers who present their badge can play 18 holes of golf at The Grove Park Inn’s award winning, Donald Ross designed course for a $25 donation. Volunteers will also be stationed at the golf course collecting donations until 2 p.m. All proceeds will go to the Fallen Firefighters Fund, set up by the Asheville Fire Department and Mission Health System to assist the family of Capt. Jeff Bowen, an Asheville firefighter who was killed in the line of duty on July 28, 2011, as well as firefighters who were injured that day.

In support of this golf fundraiser, Grove Park Inn employees will also be selling hot dogs and soft drinks, with proceeds benefitting the Fund. There will also be a raffle for a round of golf, a one night stay at the legendary Grove Park Inn, and other great prizes. To register to play in this special tournament, or for more information, contact Mike Marshall of the Asheville Firefighters Association at 828-775-8650.

Visit www.groveparkinn.com, for more information, or follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ewgrove and Facebook at www.facebook.com/groveparkinn.